How to test SSD alignment?

Basic


Drivers Solid State (SSD) is modern computer storage devices designed to supplement or replace the typical hard drive plates. As SSDs are based on NAND flash memory, it can access the memory cells to the disk immediately, resulting in superior performance in boot times, access to programs and instructions based on reading and writing. However, like hard drives, SSDs suffer degradation in performance if they are not properly aligned before or during the installation of an operating system. Windows Vista and Microsoft Windows 7 SSD align automatically, but you can try your alignment using various methods.

How to test SSD alignment

How to test SSD alignment?
1. Enter your computer with an administrator-level account. Some user-level accounts may not have access to the information you need.
2. Open a text file on your computer. You will need to recover delete information in the following steps.
3. Retrieves information clearing partition your SSD. You can find this information in the application MSInfo your operating system, under the heading “Partition Starting Offset” (compensation boot partition). To access this application, open the “Start” menu, click the “Run” and enter “msinfo” button. Alternatively, you can navigate to the directory “c: \ windows \ system32” and double click the “msinfo32.exe” file. Save this information in a text file.
4. Retrieves the size of the allocation unit file. You can find this value system by opening a window and entering the command “fsutil ntfsinfo fsinfo C” where “C” is the drive letter of your SSD. The “Bytes Per Cluster” (bytes per group) value in the result list is the size of the allocation unit file. Save this information in a text file.
5. Retrieves information “erase block size NAND” and “page size NAND” the manufacturer of your SSD. Save this information in a text file.
6. Retrieves the “stripe unit size” (for RAID partitions only). This is the value that you used to create the RAID.

Calculate SSD alignment
1. Open a calculator application. In Microsoft Windows, click the “Start” button (top) and select “All Programs” (All Programs), “Accessories” (accessories) and “Calculator” (calculator).
2. Divide compensation partition between the page sizes NAND. If this calculation results in an integer, your SSD partition has passed the first test. If this calculation results in an integer, your SSD partition is not properly aligned.
3. Divide compensation partition between the size of file allocation unit. If this calculation results in an integer, your SSD partition has passed the second test. If not result in an integer, your SSD partition is not aligned properly.
4. Divide partition offset between the block size erase NAND. If this calculation results in an integer, your SSD partition has passed the second test. If not results in an integer, your SSD partition is not properly aligned.
5. For users of RAID configuration, divide the compensation of the partition between the sizes of the stripe unit. It also calculates the stripe unit size divided by the size of file allocation unit. If these calculations result integers your partition RAID SSD test has passed. If you are not integers, the RAID partition your SSD is not aligned properly.

Tips and Warnings
– There are also many partition alignment tools online that you can use to test the alignment of an SSD. Each of these tools still required to provide the information retrieved in Section 1.
– Try SSD alignment and change are very different things. Change the alignment of a partition generally results in a total loss of data. Do not try to realign your SSD partition without first performing a full backup of all data.

Share Button

Leave a Reply